Back to School

It’s that time of year in NYC (I know other parts of the country already started) when buses are filled with children sporting back packs, tales of summer vacation are told and germs are spread.
In my office, it is also the time of year in which adults get re-exposed to germs they haven’t seen in years – the kids get a sniffle at best, and the adults (especially new teachers) feel like they’ve been hit by a Mack truck! Why is this?  What is it about “kid germs” that affect adults so severely?
The reason for this comes from our immune systems. The fevers we get and the aches we feel are a result of our bodies response to the infection. The more our immune systems get activated – the worse we feel!
Our immune systems develop memory. That’s why you only get certain diseases once. If you are exposed again later in life – the memory of the infection may have faded – and your body responds in full force.  When you are exposed to similar infections multiple times – or if you are vaccinated against a disease you body can respond faster and with less inflammation – and you don’t feel sick!  An MMR – measles, mumps, rubella – vaccine given in childhood and an adult booster gives enough immune memory to last a lifetime.
To help stop the spread of these infections basic hygiene is our best defense – HAND WASHING with soap and water or hand sanitizer.  Covering our mouths when we cough and sneeze; and taking our FLU SHOTS.
I wrote about flu shots last year.  Recent politics aside, there is no danger of getting the flu from the flu shot.  There can be side effects, depending on if you have an infection brewing or how strongly your immune system reacts to the shot, but there is no live virus in the vaccine to transmit disease.
The strains in this years flu shot are different from last year, and early reports show a good match between flu strains we are starting to see in the public and what is in the shot.  So get your flu shot, and feel better through the season!

Author: Eric Goldberg, MD, FACP

I am a Board Certified Internal Medicine physician. I currently practice at and am the Medical Director of NYU Langone Internal Medicine Associates. Posts are my opinion and not medical advice or an official position of NYU Langone Medical Center.

What are your thoughts?