Just an Internist

As I have been re-aquainting myself with NYC and meeting new people, one of the questions that invariably comes up is “What kind of doctor are you?”.  I answer, “An Internist”.  Usually that is followed by a question of what is an Internist, or if I specialize in anything.  After explaining what I do, I often get a response along the lines of – you are “just an internist”.
My very first blog post – Making a Diagnosis – Who Am I described my journey in becoming an Internist.  I put tremendous effort into developing my skills, my ability to communicate with people and gain their trust when they are at their most vulnerable.  20 years after graduating from medical school, I am still learning how to improve my skills, adapting to ever-changing environments in how medicine is practiced, and maintaining pride in a profession that has recently been quoted as having a 55% burnout rate.  So minimizing my efforts with “just an internist” is akin to telling a woman she’s just a mom.
The American College of Physicians put forth several efforts to explain Internal Medicine – both to its members and the public.  I came across an article from 2013 by Dr. Yul Ejnes about Internists being specialists in Internal Medicine – as opposed to cardiologists, gastroenterologists, and others who are sub specialists which explained this difference very well.  After reading it, I reflected on things I had seen and done in the 3 months I have been back in NYC.
I find I serve a few different roles with patients. Some patients have chronic illnesses that are already diagnosed, and they are connected to subspecialists to treat that diagnosis. What they lack is someone to help them manage all their other health needs. For them, although not directing their condition, I am helping them manage side effects of treatment and be sure that any other symptoms are evaluated properly and attributed to their condition. Others come with a new problem and need a diagnosis. Both roles require my diagnostic training, but also empathy and most importantly, communication to determine the next steps for the person in front of me.  This is what an Internist does – manage a person’s health while they deal with illness and diagnose new symptoms. 
I am just an Internist – I’m the physician you see if you have a genetic blood disorder that has been under a specialists care since you were under a year old, or you have diarrhea for 6 months and need a parasite diagnosed or you have shortness of breath for a month and need heart surgery. Just an Internist – the doctor who listens, guides and educates. Just an Internist, a physician specializing in Medicine.

Author: Eric Goldberg, MD, FACP

I am a Board Certified Internal Medicine physician. I currently practice at and am the Medical Director of NYU Langone Internal Medicine Associates. Posts are my opinion and not medical advice or an official position of NYU Langone Medical Center.

What are your thoughts?