Reality Check – why an Internist is important

It was a typical Monday for an Internist – lots of phone calls, catching up on results that came in over the weekend, a full office schedule.  I was about to go see my next patient when my assistant said that Dr. X was on the phone about a patient, could I take the call.  I popped into my next patient’s room and told them I’d be 2 minutes – they said no problem and I went to my office to take the call.

The call was from a sports medicine fellow working with a specialist that I’d sent Mr. Smith to (name changed).  I met Mr. Smith about 2 months ago, he had new onset high blood pressure and complained of back pain.  We’d started some blood pressure medication and he was seeing the sports medicine specialist to design an exercise program for his back.  He’d gotten an MRI as part of his evaluation, and instead of showing the expected herniated disc, it showed metastatic cancer – from where, we did not know.  We called Mr. Smith and had him come in the next day to review his scan.

I met with Mr. Smith and his wife the next day.  I took them through the scan findings, explaining what we could and couldn’t tell.  He told me his back wasn’t too painful, and the specialist was helping manage it.  We talked about a plan – blood tests and CT scans to find the source of the cancer.  I told them I’d speak to an oncologist – and arranged his appointment with him.

Two days later, I had the blood work and his CT results, and we met again.  The news was not good – there were extensive metastases in his spine and it looked like lung cancer – though we still couldn’t be sure.  I sat with the Smiths, and we discussed a plan.  They’d be seeing the oncologist in a couple of days, I’d already sent there results over.  We discussed the next steps, what the oncologist would likely do next.  We talked about how he hadn’t been sleeping well, and that I could help with that.

The Smiths left – and I was drained.  It was very emotional telling someone who felt fine they have metastatic cancer.  Yet we both left the encounter optimistic.  The Smiths understood they have an uphill battle, but together they felt informed, guided and supported.

How Mr. Smith does is mostly out of my hands – yet I know I played a huge roll in getting them ready.  I did all the things I love about medicine – bonded with a patient, made a diagnosis, educated them and got them ready for the next steps.  This is Internal Medicine, and why I do what I do.